The Top 7 Best Private Banks Around the World

Exclusivity comes with a winnowing set of risk and a growing set of rewards. It costs money to reach for higher financial status, but obtaining such comes with a bevvy of perks.

It gets harder to manage everything the higher up you go, which is why specialized services come into being. Among the most broadly useful special services for the wealthy is the private bank. A place to house your wealth where it does work instead of collecting dust.

These banks offer more to their clients than other banking organizations. They offer fine-tuned control and added value to the banking experience, which explains why the largest private financial organization takes care of over 2 trillion USD

But which bank does one chose for their own needs? A lot of factors go into making such a choice but this list will provide criteria and options. 

Private Bank Offerings

The majority of what exclusive banks offer is hands-on experience and attention. Instead of dealing with a banker that deals with dozens, if not hundreds, of accounts, each getting a bit of nodding and hand waving when customers ask about their interest rates or money, a private bank offers professionalism.

Wealth Management

The growth and management of wealth ranks among the best private banking services. 

The overlap between wealth management services and private banking is so large that it’s more worth mentioning how they are different. The largest benefit of a bank over a management service is accessibility.

Finances in a bank are more available in a moment without taking time to untie or vest before moving. Not all funds deposited stay completely accessible, but more so than with a management service. 

Dedicated Personnel

Instead of having one banker with quotas and customers, you gain access to a dedicated person looking after you. This person may even be a team of people, depending. Their job is to work with you and your wealth to increase your bottom line and keep you aware of opportunities for growth.

You save time through individual attention. No going through a file each time you call to remember who you are. They know you and your needs on a personal level.

Dedicated Attention

The attention you receive from a personal representative bleed over into personal assistant territory. They anticipate your needs and offer additional help in planning and creating.

Network of Specialists

Your personal banker and banking team also bring you the benefit of other specialists. At some point, you will need to encounter and deal with tax attorneys, trust managers, and estate advisors. 

your personal banker can offer referrals for each of these that they have personal experience working with. This saves you the time to vet and research for these people.

Perks in Pricing

Offerings, in terms of services, from a private bank contain everything you would see at a lower bank but with incentives woven throughout.

You can expect to see discounts and freebies on some services. It’s quite common to be offered free personalized checks or a safe-deposit box. While it’s not everything, can save upwards of $300 annually on a box.

Of course, most private banks have some fees for their services but it’s nice to see the value additions they supply.

Private Bank Profiles

Now that you have an idea of what types of services you’ll find in a private bank, you can evaluate the following. Each of these excels in their service, security, and returns tho their clients. 

1. DBS Private Banking

This Singapore-based institution offers top-class digital transformation. They have trademarked the term iWealth to show their dedication to digital movements.

Their personnel are well versed in tech and connected to Asian and pan-Asian markets that seek to expand influence through the region. They’ve shown impressive growth in the last few years as well, jumping over 31% in assets in 2018.

2. J. Safra Sarasin

For those looking for a social-minded banking experience, Sarasin leads in programs bolstering societal goals. 

The bank has been in operation since 1841 as a family-owned business. They have spent the better part of three decades building a reputation for sustainable technology. 

They’ve grown while doing so, 23% in 2017 alone. They show that responsibility and social awareness can be profitable endeavours.

3. U.S. Trust

This top private bank offers a somewhat different set of offerings than others. Rather than focus on business owners and hairs, they work with executives and heads of industry.

The bank itself is part of a structure, as such, it is more branding than individual institutions. They work on stock options and retirement benefits for industry employees, which gives them substantial assets. Ideally, they work most often with C-Suite executives. 

4. UBS

The top holding private bank is the world’s largest financier. It gained this honour after smart mergers between its U.S. management and its international operations. together they aim to provide the best and most complete investment and client services. 

5. BBVA

Most private bank accounts start at $1 million in holdings. A few offer accounts for less, especially to financial movers, those with a definite possibility of increasing their portfolio rapidly.

BBVA works with a floor of $340,000. 

Currently, it is involved with large housing markets in Spain and holds a presence in Latin American markets. These growing sectors provide new investment opportunities for clients. 

6. Citi Private Bank

On the other hand, if you are looking to work with much more than the minimum, Citi Private is looking for that demographic. The bank caters to those with $25 million or more in assets.

They operate with a global strategic view, considering their high-end clients to be global citizens.

They work with multimillion-dollar investments and huge, intricate hedge funds. Their growth of 18% in 2017 shows they know who to influence and call shots.

7. Pictect

For those looking for something a bit more local, Pictect caters to the Western European market. An old-line Swiss bank in operation since 1805 with a foothold in Asia. 

They work it old school, using investment banking and cross-selling of credit to bolster dividends. Pictect offers a small, cosy feel with a lot of clout in the world.

Finance a Future

Few people get to experience the thrill of shopping for a private bank. It’s not everyone that has the assets to qualify for joining one of these venerable institutions. 

For further information on the banking industry and its impacts, read more here

Opening Your First Account: What to Look for in a Bank

Are you considering opening your first bank or looking for one for your child? Don’t just go with the one down the block due to convenience. There are actually more options out there than you realize – and some that can save you money and keep your cash safer for the long term!

Read on for our top tips on what to look for in a bank so that you can store your wealth the smart way. 

1. What Kind of Account Do You Need? 

Some banks offer you more perks for checking accounts versus savings accounts, and the other way around. This can be due to higher interest rates, convenient mobile checking deposit options, or banks that don’t charge you monthly fees. 

If you don’t want your money to stagnant in a savings account and want to save more, then a high-interest savings account may be for you. Although many brick-and-mortar banks don’t offer very high interest, many online banks do. 

Perhaps you want to replace your current checking out. Larger banks offer more options if you want flexibility, and there are also high-yield checking accounts that are offered by online banks, credit unions, and community banks. 

2. Avoid Minimum Balances

Some banks require you to have hefty minimum deposits, which essentially locks your money up in an account for the foreseeable future without earning much interest. Online banks such as Ally Bank and Capital One 360 offer checking accounts that don’t require a minimum balance. Smaller banks and credit unions are also less likely to require minimum balances. 

3. Avoid Overdraft Fees

Overdraft fees are one of the biggest penalties to hit consumers. Banks can charge $35 or more for each overdraft to your account if you’ve opted for overdraft protection, which can become a vicious cycle. The bank is essentially giving you a loan with a hefty fee attached. 

Overdraft protection isn’t required, even though banks will try to push you towards it. When you don’t have overdraft protection, your purchases or ATM withdrawals are simply declined if you have insufficient funds. Remember to read the fine print of whichever bank you choose and go with the option that has fewer fees, or no fees at all. 

Some banks will allow account holders to link a savings account or credit card to your account and transfer money if you have insufficient funds. You’ll avoid large fees, but you’ll also be able to complete your purchases. 

You’ll also want to see if your bank is capable of sending you text alerts if you have a low-balance or have crossed a threshold you’ve indicated. With banks that offer mobile apps, you’ll have a much easier time monitoring your account’s balance. 

4. Consider Accessibility 

Although online banks come with a lot of perks, they can lack the convenience of big brick-and-mortar banks. If you’re having issues with an account or need to deposit cash, this is much easier with a traditional bank. 

Many online banks require you to mail in your cash if you need to make a deposit. If you’ve noticed any fraudulent activity on your account or need some assistance, you’ll need to chat with a customer service representative online or call. Depending on how effective their customer service is, this can either be a convenience or a major hindrance. 

Carefully think about your accessibility needs and choose the bank that makes your life easier for the longterm. 

5. Consider Spending Habits

You’ll also want to consider your lifestyle. If you’re making an effort to save money, many financial advisors recommend you go with a bank that allows you to open and name multiple accounts. This enables you to have one checking account and separate savings accounts for all your different savings goals, such as emergency money, gift funds, and travel funds. 

Portioning out your money this way makes it far easier to budget. When you access your account online, you’ll see right away how much money you have available to spend and how much you need to save. 

6. Digital Features

There are a lot of digital features available now that make your life a lot easier and your account more secure. This includes the ability to transfer funds, deposit checks, and pay bills all through an app.

Some banks offer the ability to immediately lock a debit card or customize it to not allow international purchases or purchases out of your local area. Overall, banks are pushing towards more high-tech solutions, including utilizing IoT

If you’re predominantly a debit card user, this kind of peace of mind is invaluable. Make sure to browse a bank’s website and read their app reviews to see how convenient and developed their digital features are. 

7. Read Terms & Conditions

It may seem unnecessary, but you really should read the fine print before opening a bank account, especially one that you’ve found online. Here are a few things you should check for: 

  • Monthly service fees
  • Out-of-network ATM charges
  • FDIC insured savings accounts
  • Promotional deals that are expiring

You need to know exactly what you’re getting into before you join a bank or open one for your child – this saves you future headaches. If you find that you want to open a checking account with one bank and savings with another, ask yourself if this will suit your lifestyle and if you’d be able to keep up with it. 

What to Look for in a Bank: Secure Money that Grows

When you consider what to look for in a bank, it’s all about finding one that suits your lifestyle, keeps your money secure through insurance and smart digital features, and doesn’t let your money stagnate.

For instance, if you have thousands of dollars worth of savings, keeping it in a savings account with a low interest rate for years will actually be losing you money. Inflation rates rise while your purchasing power diminishes. You would do better to store this in a CD or high-interest savings account.

If you have a teenager that’s opening his or her first bank account, maybe they would do better with an account that offers the ability to open multiple savings accounts. This will help them learn how to budget effectively.

If you found this article helpful, keep reading our banking section for the latest news and analysis of banking policies around the world!

What Is Investment Banking? (And the Top Investment Banks Out There)

Investment banking plays a key role in global economics. For instance, as of July 2019, JP Morgan constituted 9.0% of the global investment banking revenue. However, for the majority of us, investment banking is a mystery.

By learning about investment banking today, you’ll be ready to make informed choices if you want to improve your financial situation through IPO investing.

Read on as we answer the question: “What is investment banking?” 

What is Investment Banking? 

The duties of investment banks are completely different than traditional banking. While the traditional banks we’re used to visiting take in deposits from consumers and businesses and lend out money, investment banks sell securities. They also help finance large projects that traditional banking won’t touch due to the high risks involved.

Robert Johnson, Professor of finance at Heider College of Business, Brighton University, puts it simply. “Investment banking is a method of controlling the flow of money.” With the huge amounts of money at stake, investment banks have a key role in American economics. 

The projects they finance include: 

Large Financial Projects

Projects such as constructing infrastructure need large amounts of upfront cash. Investment banks are able to accumulate this cash by selling securities to investors. 

Company Sales

Instead of acquiring loans to gain capital, entrepreneurs who want to expand their companies sell portions of their companies to the public, or an initial public offering (IPO). Investment bankers are integral to this process, and it’s one of their most important functions. They find investors looking to buy and companies looking to sell.

Initial public offerings are risky investments – there’s no guarantee that they’ll increase in value, though some IPOs are wildly successful. However, if you’re ready to invest in an IPO, you can do so by opening a brokerage account. 

Typically, the IPO price is fixed for a limited group of investors who fit the eligibility requirements. For most investors, the price of the IPO will be higher once it begins officially trading. 

According to the investment bank UBS, out of 7,000 companies between 1975 and 2011, 60% had negative total returns after five years of public trading. Do your research, buy conservatively, and keep a balanced portfolio to mitigate your risks!

Mergers and Acquisitions

Another way that companies can expand is through mergers and acquisitions. Investment bankers will help companies buy another, which can be more cost-effective than trying to compete. 

Despite the risks, buying companies still has a lot of benefits. A company may want access to international markets through a company that’s already established in another region. A larger company may be interested in a smaller company’s technology. They may also want to integrate vertically, such as buying a supplier of materials they need. 

Asset Management and Brokerage Services

Investment bankers help clients manage their money and generate returns. They do this by choosing individual stocks or putting their money into mutual funds. 

The Top Investment Banks

These top investment banks were able to maintain and grow their market positions throughout volatile years. In terms of investment revenue, the top investment banks include: 

1. Goldman Sachs

Headquartered at 200 West Street, New York City, Goldman Sachs operates branches throughout the world in all major financial centres. In 2018, its investment banking revenue was $7.86 billion. In 2019, they had a market capitalization of $78 billion. 

2. JP Morgan

JP Morgan is the second largest investment bank in the world. In 2018, it reported $7 billion in revenue. It’s also one of the oldest financial institutions in the world with a history that goes back to 1799.

3. Bank of America

In 2019, Bank of America rebranded its investment arm to Bank of America Securities. In 2018, it’s investment banking revenue was $5.3 billion. 

4. Morgan Stanley

Morgan Stanley is based in New York with branches in 40 different countries. In 2018, it’s totally investment banking revenues were $6.1 billion. 

5. Citigroup

Also located in New York, Citigroup Inc. had reported total revenue of $72.9 billion in 2018. It’s one of the big four banks in the United States and the third-largest bank in the world. 

6. Barclays 

Barclays Investment Bank, the investment arm of Barclays, is headquartered in London and has branches in 30 different countries. Its global investment banking fee share is approximately 4.2%. 

7. Credit Suisse

In 2018, Credit Suisse reported a net income of $1.8 billion, attributable to shareholders in the United States. Based in Zurich and established in 1856, it has branches in 50 countries. 

8. Deutsche Bank

This is the leading financial institution in Germany and one of the largest investment banks in Europe. It has about $2.5 billion in investment banking revenue and a market capitalization of $15 billion in 2019. It has branches in 60 other countries.

9. Wells Fargo

Wells Fargo offers banking and investment services in 40 countries. As of 2018, it’s generated investment banking fees are $1.8 billion.

10. Jefferies Financial Group

This full-service investment bank founded in 1962 is based in New York with regional offices in London and Hong Kong. It also has offices in 30 cities throughout America, Europe, and Asia. In 2018 its investment banking revenues were $1.9 billion.

Demystifying Investment Banking

If you’ve ever asked yourself what is investment banking, you should now understand the basic premise. Investment banking is all about the flow of large amounts of money from one institution to another, and through research, analysis, and recommendations, investment bankers try to find the best deals for their clients. 

Want to read more about the state of investment banking today in the global economy? Keep reading our banking section for more informative articles.